Philosophy

Vision

By 2022 the Department of Interior Design will be distinguished for quality education that promotes diversity, innovation, sustainability, and collaboration, that caters for the needs of a ‘glocal’ society.

Mission

The mission of the Interior Design Department is to nurture a culturally diverse learning and teaching experience. While imparting evidence-based design, the department underscores innovation, collaboration, and sustainability principles that address the needs of the ‘glocal’ contexts.


Program Goals

  1. To encourage critical thinking, exploration, and independent thinking that will lead to innovation and diversity of thought and expression even beyond graduation.
     
  2. To expose students to a design process that combines the intellectual process of creating with the physical process of making.
     
  3. To align the curriculum with professional interior design standards and practices in order to impart core competencies needed by graduating interior design students in the Middle East.
     
  4. To encourage students to value and understand their own design culture, while examining design knowledge and precedents of other cultures.
     
  5. To partner with the design industry and stay current with the profession through educational and research initiatives.
     
  6. To foster leadership and prepare our graduates to join a relatively young design community in which they have the opportunity to become the knowledge leaders.
     
  7. To nurture ties to our alumni and encourage their life-long learning.

CIDA AGGREGATE DATA COUNCIL FOR INTERIOR DESIGN ACCREDITATION

Class of 2016
Job Placement
30.7% of the students (4/13) who graduated in May 2016 were employed by January 1, 2017. This low rate is in comparison to the previous academic year and can be explained by the plummeting oil prices that had a major impact on the job market.

For more details on job placement and collateral impacts, see the data hereunder:
Unemployed: 30.7% (4/13)
Unemployed by choice: 15.3% (2/13)
Within six months: 30.7% (4/13)
More than six months: N/A
Joined Graduate School: 7.6% (1/13) –
Freelancer: 7.6% (1/13)
Unknown: 7.6% (1/13)

Acceptance into Graduate Programs
One student 7.6% (1/13) from the Class of 2015 secured graduate school enrollment.

Graduation Rates
84% (11/13) of the students from the Class of 2015 graduated in four years. Contrary to the previous academic year, the internship offering was readjusted so that students graduate in May. This has enhanced the May graduation rates.

Retention/Attrition
100% of the students who enrolled during the spring 2016 semester returned in fall 2016, putting attrition at 0%.

 

Class of 2015
Job Placement
54.5% of the students who graduated in May 2015 were employed by January 1, 2016.

For more details on job placement and collateral data, see the data hereunder:
Unemployed: 4.5% (1/22)
Unemployed by choice: 4.5% (1/22)
Within six months: 54.5% (12/22)
More than six months: 4.5% (1/22)
Joined Graduate School: 13.6% (3/22)
Unknown: 18.1% (4/22

Acceptance into Graduate Programs
Three students 13.6% (3/22) from the Class of 2015 secured graduate school enrollment.

Graduation Rates
77% (17/22) of the students from the Class of 2015 graduated in four years. Contrary to the previous academic year, the internship offering was readjusted so that students graduate in May. This has enhanced the May graduation rates.

Retention/Attrition
95% (21/22) of the students enrolled during the spring 2015 semester returned in fall 2015, putting attrition at 5%.


Class of 2014
Job Placement
44% of the students who graduated in May 2013 were employed by January 1, 2014.

Acceptance into Graduate Programs
One student from the May 2013 graduating class who applied to graduate school—Master of Fine Arts at VCUarts Qatar — was accepted.

Graduation Rates
32% of the students from the Class of 2013 graduated in four years. This low graduation rate might be explained by the fact that many seniors complete their internship during the summer semesters. If the graduation rate is calculated, including the summer semesters, the graduation rate will be much higher.

Retention/Attrition
100% of the students who enrolled during the spring 2013 semester returned in fall 2013, putting attrition at 0%.

WEAVE REPORT WRITE, ESTABLISH, ASSESS, VIEW, AND EFFECT

Student Learning Objectives:

Global Perspective for Design
Student work will demonstrate understanding of: a) the concepts, principles, and theories of sustainability as they pertain to building methods, materials, systems, and occupants, b) the implications of conducting the practice of design within a world context, c) how design needs may vary for a range of socio‐economic stakeholders, and d) students understand that social and behavioral norms may vary from their own and are relevant to making appropriate design decisions.

Design Process
Students will be able to: a) identify and define relevant aspects of a design problem, b) gather appropriate information and research findings to solve the problem, c) generate multiple concepts and/or multiple design responses to programmatic requirements, and d) demonstrate creative thinking and originality through presentation of a variety of ideas, approaches, and concepts.

Collaboration
Students work will demonstrate an awareness of the role of: a) collaboration, consensus building, leadership, and team work, and b) interaction with multiple disciplines representing a variety of points of view and perspectives.

Communication
Students will be able to a) express ideas clearly in oral and written communication, b) use sketches as a design and communication tool (ideation drawings), c) produce competent presentation drawings across a range of appropriate media, and d) produce competent contract documents including coordinated drawings, schedules, and specifications, and  e) integrate oral and visual material to present ideas clearly.

Business Practice
Students projects/tests will demonstrate understanding of: a) the contributions of interior design to contemporary society, b) various types of design practices, c) the elements of business practice (business development, financial management, strategic planning, and various forms of collaboration and integration of disciplines), d) the elements of project management, project communication, and project delivery methods, and e) professional ethics.

History of Design

Students projects/tests will show understanding of the social, political, and physical influences affecting historical changes in design of the built environment, b) movements and periods in interior design and furniture, c) movements and traditions in architecture, and d) stylistic movements and periods of art.

 

Space, Form, and Color

Student work will demonstrate effective application of: a) two‐dimensional design solutions. b) three‐dimensional design solutions, c) color principles, theories, and systems, and d) the interaction of color with materials, texture, light, form and the impact on interior environments.

 

Furniture, Fixtures, Equipment, and Finish Materials

 Student work will demonstrate effective application of a) broad range of materials, products, and maintenance requirements, b) appropriate materials and products on the basis of their properties and performance criteria, including ergonomics, environmental attributes, and life cycle cost, and c) layout and specify furniture, fixtures, and equipment.

 

Environmental Systems

Student work will demonstrate: a) understanding of the principles of natural and electrical lighting design, b) competency in the selection and application of light fixtures and light sources, c) understanding of  the principles of acoustical design, e) understanding of the principles of thermal design, g) understanding of the principles of indoor air quality.

 

Interior Construction and Building Systems

Student work will demonstrate understanding of: a) structural systems and methods, b) non‐structural systems including ceilings, flooring, and interior walls, c) distribution systems including power, mechanical, HVAC, data/voice telecommunications, and plumbing, d) energy, security, and building controls systems, e) the interface of furniture with distribution and construction systems, and f) vertical circulation systems

 

Regulations

Student work will demonstrate understanding of laws, codes, standards, and guidelines that impact fire and life safety, including: a) compartmentalization: fire separation and smoke containment, b) movement: access to the means of egress including stairwells, corridors, exitways, c) detection: active devices that alert occupants including smoke/heat detectors and alarm systems, d) suppression: devices used to extinguish flames including sprinklers, standpipes, fire hose cabinets, extinguishers, etc.